Posts Tagged ‘Republicans’

Jeremy Castle on Religion and Voting Behavior

How does religious messaging affect voter attitudes towards a candidate? Prof. Jeremy Castle (Central Michigan University) discusses some experimental research he conducted on this topic with a number of colleagues and shares observations on a wide range of factors that affect how individuals vote. We discuss the political and social attitudes of Millennial evangelicals, and how religious rhetoric played out during the 2016 presidential election. Jeremy also chats about his work on whether or not political messages in movies have an impact on individuals.

Connect with us on iTunes, Facebook, and Twitter!

David Campbell & Quin Monson on Mormons & Politics in America

What is it like to be Mormon and political in the United States? We invite Prof. David Campbell (Notre Dame) and Prof. Quin Monson (BYU) to discuss why members of the Latter Day Saints are considered a “peculiar people” (a term adopted from the Old Testament) and how this has affected their political affiliation and attitudes on a variety of issues. Both scholars also share their own perspectives growing up Mormon and how being a religious minority can affect one’s identity.

Join us on our Facebook Fan Page or Twitter feed for regular updates. Click the buttons in the right-hand column.

Who Would Jesus Vote For? A Redemption Church Small Group

In an unusual podcast format, we take a peek into a “small group” at Redemption Church called “Theology on Tap” to discover how your typical churchgoer wrangles with political issues in light of their evangelical faith. The topic of the night’s discussion was “Who would Jesus vote for?” Listen to the various twists and turns, and sometimes surprising statements, from this group of sixteen individuals in the small town of Duvall, WA.

Gerald De Maio on the Electoral Religion Gap

With the election season heating up, we revisit the issue of whether religion plays a role in voting behavior in the United States. Prof. Gerald De Maio (Baruch College, CUNY) discusses his collaborative research with Louis Bolce on the “religion gap” in American politics. This research indicates that those who attend church more regularly, or who hold more orthodox religious views, tend to vote much differently than seculars. De Maio and Bolce’s research also shows how the media has failed to pick up on this electoral divide while touting other “gaps” — e.g., gender, age, soccer moms — that are much less salient when it comes to predicting election outcomes. We speculate how the “religion gap” will play out in the November 2012 elections.

To download, right click on the download link above and select “save target as…” or subscribe for free on iTunes. And please “like” our Facebook Fan Page (Research on Religion with Anthony Gill) to get information about upcoming episodes and see the cartoon that was mentioned in this podcast.

Douglas Baker on Dominionism, Michele Bachmann, & Rick Perry

Douglas Baker (Union University) clarifies the recent debate surrounding “Dominionism” and its relation to various Republican presidential candidates, most notably Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry. He covers the influence of thinkers such as Francis Schaeffer and Rousas John Rushdoony and how their thought has influenced others, as well as how their thinking has been misrepresented in the popular media. We also reflect on the proper role of religion in the public square.

Tell your friends about our podcast using the social media links below!

Ken Wald on the Puzzling Politics of American Jews

Why are American Jews more liberal than their socio-economic non-Jewish counterparts?
Why are they more politically liberal than Jews in other countries? And what explains the rightward, then leftward, drift of Jews from the 1970s to present? Prof. Ken Wald provides an interesting historical explanation to these three puzzles. A great complimentary episode to last week’s discussion.

Connect with us on Facebook by clicking the icon below and to the right!

Darin Mather on Evangelicals and Racial Attitudes

Darin Mather, a PhD candidate at the University of Minnesota, discusses changing racial attitudes among younger evangelicals (defined as being born after 1957) and their elders, showing how the former are much more tolerant than the latter. Mather’s research also demonstrates that younger evangelicals are becoming more tolerant of racial diversity and have a greater sense of racial solidarity much like their younger non-evangelical counterparts. However, we note that younger evangelicals differ from their peers on public policy issues such as affirmative action and economic assistance to historically disadvantaged communities. We explore reasons for these similarities and differences.

“Like us” and link to us on our new Facebook fan page! See the logo below.

Louis Bolce on the Media and Anti-Fundamentalism

Prof. Louis Bolce reveals how the news media view Christian fundamentalists and how that media image translates into elite opinion. Based upon extensive use of survey research, Prof. Bolce notes that even though there has been a growing “religious gap” in the American electorate (larger than the “gender gap”), media outlets did not pick up on this trend in a serious way until the 2004 presidential election. The coverage of fundamentalists and evangelicals at that time tended to reinforce stereotypes about this group among individuals who are most attentive to the news.

Subscribe to Research on Religion via iTunes or Zune … and tell a friend about us!

Corwin Smidt on Religion, Elections and the God Gap

Corwin Smidt (Calvin College and the Henry Institute) discusses the role that religion plays in national elections with a focus on the 2008 presidential campaign. We explore whether the “God gap” disappeared in the 2008 presidential contest and whether religion will play a role in the 2010 mid-term elections for Congress. (To download, right click on the download button and choose “save target as…”).

You can now subscribe to our podcast by entering on iTunes or Zune.

Search The Podcast
To search the podcast, type a term and click the Search button.

Connect With Us