Posts Tagged ‘religious pluralism’


Mark David Hall on Religious Accommodations and the Common Good

As a number of religious accommodation cases are winding their way through the U.S. court system, we invite Prof. Mark David Hall (George Fox University) to discuss the history of religious exemptions in American history. In addition to whether or not a florist or baker should be exempted from providing services to same-sex weddings based on religious beliefs, we also examine rights of conscience accommodations granted to religious groups for military service, the swearing of oaths, mandatory school attendance, and vaccinations. Prof. Hall explains how “Americans at their best” have accommodated religious views since colonial days and speculates on what the future holds.

To download our podcast, right click on the download button and select “save as….”

[ READ THE FULL ARTICLE ]
Joshua Hall on Adam Smith, Religious Competition, and the Simpsons

What did Adam Smith have to say on the effects of religious pluralism in a nation? And can what Smith hypothesized be tested today to see if it bears out? And what does this have to do with The Simpsons? Prof. Joshua Hall of West Virginia University explains a recent study he conducted that shows countries with higher levels of religious diversity have less regulated religious markets, just as Smith would predict. We also think about endogeneity and other fancy words, culminating in the economics of The Simpsons, which is not related to the main topic, but which is really cool nonetheless.

To download, please right click on the “download” button and choose “save as….” Or subscribe to iTunes and never miss an episode!

[ READ THE FULL ARTICLE ]
David Mislin on Embracing Religious Pluralism

When and how did embracing religious pluralism become an American value? Prof. David Mislin (Temple University) discusses the significant changes that occurred within mainline Protestantism between 1875 and 1925 that helped shape the way the United States manages religious diversity. David argues that increased global travel, the rise of new scientific theories, and other cultural changes prompted a number of clergy and theologians within the mainline Protestant tradition to embrace religious pluralism, an intellectual shift that has had lasting impact to this day. At the end of the podcast, Tony asks Prof. Mislin a “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” question.

We are free on iTunes!

[ READ THE FULL ARTICLE ]
Rajdeep Singh on American Sikhs and Religious Liberty

What is the Sikh religion and how have Sikhs fit into American society? Rajdeep Singh of the Sikh Coalition explains the history, tenets, rituals, and practices of his faith, as well as the challenges this religious minority has faced in the United States. We discuss how Sikhs have been instrumental in championing religious liberty with cases about religious garb in Oregon and issues of occupational safety.

Do you know someone who might enjoy these free podcasts? Let them know about us!

[ READ THE FULL ARTICLE ]
Christopher Grenda on Religious Satire during the Enlightenment (and Today)

Can satire be used to prompt religious reform? Prof. Chris Grenda (CUNY) discusses the role of humor, parody, irony, and satire in the changing religious landscape of the English Enlightenment (circa 17th and 18th centuries). We discuss the nature and role of satire in society and review a number of major historical satirists including Jonathan Swift and Thomas Paine, as well as the lesser known figures such as Ralph Wallis, Charles Blount, and Anthony Ashley-Cooper, the Third Earl of Shaftesbury. All of these satirists used their wit to advance the frontiers of religious toleration in an environment of growing religious pluralism and institutional corruption. How the “powers that be” — both ecclesiastical and secular — react to being the focus of ridicule is also discussed. We further bring the discussion into the contemporary era with references to Mark Steyn, Monty Python, and George Carlin. Prof. Grenda provides a number of interesting observations on what is happening to the rhetorical device of satire in our contemporary era.

Please become our friend by linking to our Facebook Fan Page by clicking on the “blue f” icon on the right hand column.

[ READ THE FULL ARTICLE ]
Anthony Gill on the Political Origins of Religious Liberty

For the past two and a half years, Tony Gill has interviewed over 135 guests on this podcast. Today, Prof. Steve Pfaff takes over as guest host and interviews Tony about his recent book, “The Political Origins of Religious Liberty.” We discuss what religious liberty is and why a government would ever want to allow religious groups to have greater freedom. Tony emphasizes the political and economic motivations behind “deregulating the religious marketplace”, including the need to attract immigrants, promote free trade, and generate economic growth and tax revenue. We focus attention on colonial American history, but also discuss religious freedom in Russia, China, Mexico, Chile and a few other places. This interview is a great complement to other podcasts we have had on the topic of religious liberty, and an opportunity to see what your weekly host is really thinking about!

Join us on our Facebook Fan Page for regular updates. Subscribe for free on iTunes. And please tell your friends using our social network links below!

[ READ THE FULL ARTICLE ]
Hunter Baker on Secularism

What role should religion be allowed to play in the public square? Prof. Hunter Baker (Union University) discusses how the concept of “secularism” has crept into our nation’s conscience and is believed to be a philosophy of “neutrality.” Prof. Baker argues that this isn’t the case as secularism is an ideological alternative to religious belief that is privileged over religious expression in the public square. Our wide-ranging conversation takes us through discussions of Judge Roy Moore, religiously-based progressive taxation, religion in Sweden, and the philosophy of John Stuart Mill and John Rawls.

To download the podcast, “right click” on the download button and choose “Save target as…” Or subscribe to us on iTunes or with our RSS feed. And please use our social network links to tell your friends about our free, educational service.

[ READ THE FULL ARTICLE ]
Matt Boswell on Building Redemption Church, Part II

Back in the fall of 2011, we visited with Pastor Matt Boswell about his effort to create a church within a week’s span of time. We pay a return visit with Pastor Boswell to see what the next several months of church-building entails. We discuss the need to create a set of by-laws, define the requirements of membership, and find ways to establish some permanance even though the congregation meets in a high school auditorium. This is part of our ongoing examination of Redemption Church and its week-to-week and month-to-month operations. Note: This is the church that your host attends on an almost weekly basis.

Please tell your friends about our podcast. We endeavor to make the best in scholarly research available to the general public.

[ READ THE FULL ARTICLE ]
Steve Pfaff on Denominationalism, Sin & Other Stuff

Sit in on a collegial discussion with Tony and his good friend Prof. Steve Pfaff as they discuss a range of topics including denominationalism and whether churches today emphasize sin enough. These two topics lead us down several different paths taking a look at how and why churches create brands, the benefits of religious pluralism, youth religious practice and whether megachurches are really just soft-peddling Christianity. This open-ended discussion is a window into what Tony & Steve often talk about while hanging out at the University of Washington and is a great wrap around to several recent podcasts we’ve featured on the show.

Please help us spread the word about this free service. Tell at least two friends about us using the social media links below. Thanks!

[ READ THE FULL ARTICLE ]
Patrick Mason on Anti-Mormonism and Mitt Romney

With Mitt Romney making waves as a presidential candidate frontrunner for the Republican Party, we visit with Prof. Patrick Mason to discuss the history of anti-Mormon bigotry in the United States tracing it back to the founding of the faith in the 1820s.

Subscribe to us on iTunes and let your friends know about us by using the social media links below. Thanks!

[ READ THE FULL ARTICLE ]
Search The Podcast
To search the podcast, type a term and click the Search button.

Connect With Us