Posts Tagged ‘St. Augustine’


Jim Papandrea on the Catholicism of Early Christianity

Protestants have often been critical of the Roman Catholic Church for adding on a number of traditions, rituals, and theologies that were not part of early Christianity. Prof. Jim Papandrea of the Garrett-Evangelical Seminary (Northwestern University) argues that many of these critiques are misplaced and that early Christianity was very Catholic (capital C) in nature. He discusses issues such as tradition, faith and works, the papacy, and veneration of the Saints. The conversation is very interesting given that Prof. Papandrea was once Protestant and is now Catholic, why Tony was once Catholic and is now Protestant. Ecumenical understanding is a theme running throughout our discussion.

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Sarah Bond on the Church & Funerals in Late Antiquity (Encore Presentation)

How were the funerals for the dead managed in the period of “late antiquity,” roughly spanning the middle 3rd to late 6th century? Historian Sarah Bond of Maquette University surveys the “disreputable profession” of funeral workers prior to, and after, the Edict of Milan, noting how the change in church-state relations that occured had a dramatic impact on the this critical industry. In the post-Constantinian era, funeral workers were often used as bodyguards and personal militaries for bishops, and the process of interring bodies opened the door to a great deal of corruption (rent-seeking) within the Church.

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Davis Brown on Just War Theory

What is just war theory and how can it relate to tort law?  What is the doctrine of proportionality?  And how do all these concepts apply to various conflicts including the Iraq invasion of Kuwait, Russia’s involvement its surrounding nations, and the Pig War of 1859?  Dr. Davis Brown, an assistant professor of political science […]

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Michael Foley on Religion and Booze

What relationship is there between Christianity and alcohol? We discuss this question with Prof. Michael P. Foley (Baylor University) as he leads us through his book “Drinking with the Saints,” which is one part bartender’s guide and one part spiritual manual” (according to Regnery Press). This fun conversation reveals interesting historical tidbits on everything from beer to whiskey to wine, and Prof. Foley even reveals a couple of his own cocktail recipes created in honor of the saints.

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David Dixon on Religious Rhetoric and the Civil Right Movement

Prof. David Dixon of St. Joseph’s College discusses his massive project to document various sermons and speeches giving during the height of the Civil Rights Movement (1954-65). These speeches are from lesser known individuals who were nonetheless a critical part of the social environment pushing for civil liberties for African Americans and others. We also discuss how this project relates to his previous and ongoing research on religion in Latin America.

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Sarah Bond on the Church and Funerals in Late Antiquity

How were the funerals for the dead managed in the period of “late antiquity,” roughly spanning the middle 3rd to late 6th century? Historian Sarah Bond of Marquette University surveys the “disreputable profession” of funeral workers prior to, and after, the Edict of Milan, noting how the change in church-state relations that occurred had a dramatic impact on the this critical industry. In the post-Constantinian era, funeral workers were often used as bodyguards and personal militaries for bishops, and the process of interring bodies opened the door to a great deal of corruption (rent-seeking) within the Church.

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Michael McClymond on Jonathan Edwards

Jonathan Edwards is often considered one of the greatest theologians in US history. Prof. Michael McClymond reviews the fascinating life and times of Rev. Edwards and shows how his theology evolved over time based upon his surrounding circumstances and personal experiences. A serious intellectual who also relished in the beauty of God’s creation, Jonathan Edwards was at the forefront of a number of theological and religious trends that became hallmarks of American Protestantism.

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Douglas Baker on Dominionism, Michele Bachmann, & Rick Perry

Douglas Baker (Union University) clarifies the recent debate surrounding “Dominionism” and its relation to various Republican presidential candidates, most notably Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry. He covers the influence of thinkers such as Francis Schaeffer and Rousas John Rushdoony and how their thought has influenced others, as well as how their thinking has been misrepresented in the popular media. We also reflect on the proper role of religion in the public square.

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Jim Papandrea on the Church Fathers & Patristic Exegesis

Who were the early Church Fathers? How did they interpret the Scripture? And how did their interpretations change over time and shape Christianity? Prof. Jim Papandrea of Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary takes up these questions in a fascinating review of history of the early Church. Dr. Papandrea discusses four different phases of “patristic exegesis” and reflects upon how the history of Scriptural interpretation matters for our religious lives today. He also answers the age old question of whether or not you should tell someone their clothing tag is hanging out during religious services. Jim’s answer to that quandry is actually quite profound!

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Scott Carroll on Biblical Manuscripts & the King James Bible

Manuscript collector extraordinaire, and former professor of ancient history, Scott Carroll joins Tony in a discussion about the King James Bible, as Baylor Univeristy prepares to celebrate the 400th anniversary of this celebrated translation. Our discussion is far ranging, discussing everything from how ancient texts were translated and disseminated to the specific history of Tudor and Stuart England. We finish with some thoughts on the impact that this particular translation of the Bible has had on our contemporary understanding of the Bible and its imprint on the English language.

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